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gothicserpent asked:

What were some of the other kaiju films seen in the Kaiju Gaiden panel and could you go a bit in depth into them?

kaijusaurus:

*Please. And yes, I can, although; there’s really not that much more to cover over and above what astoundingbeyondbelief and I have already talked about. Clips and trailers were shown from ReigoRaiga, and Giant God Warrior Appears in Tokyo, but those are much more well-known than the other titles presented. Other titles Mark had but didn’t present in the particular panel we attended were Yamato Takeru II, and Godzilla vs. Seadora (though the footage from that is now on YouTube). There was also a brief presentation about a tokusatsu/sentai troupe operating out of (I think) Los Angeles, but for the life of me, I can’t remember their name.

The troupe is called Fujiyama Ichiban.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

What is 50 shades of grey about? And what's so bad about it?

aconissa:

50 Shades of Grey was originally fanfiction based on the Twilight series, which was then published as a novel (along with 2 subsequent books). It sold over 100 million copies around the world and topped best-seller lists everywhere. It’s about to be adapted into a film, set to come out early next year.

It follows a college student named Ana Steele, who enters a relationship with a man named Christian Grey and is then introduced to a bastardised and abusive parody of BDSM culture.

While the book is paraded as erotica, the relationship between Ana and Christian is far from healthy. The core mantra of the BDSM community is “safe, sane and consensual”, and 50 Shades is anything but. None of the rules of BDSM practices (which are put in place to protect those involved) are actually upheld. Christian is controlling, manipulative, abusive, takes complete advantage of Ana, ignores safe-words, ignores consent, keeps her uneducated about the sexual practices they’re taking part in, and a multitude of other terrible things. Their relationship is completely sickening and unhealthy.

Basically, “the book is a glaring glamorisation of violence against women,” as Amy Bonomi so perfectly put it. 

It’s terrible enough that a book like this has been absorbed by people worldwide. Now, we have a film that is expected to be a huge box-office success, and will likely convince countless more young women that it’s okay not to have any autonomy in a relationship, that a man is allowed to control them entirely. It will also show many young men that women are theirs to play with and dominate, thus contributing to antiquated patriarchal values and rape culture.

lunaticobscurity:

kaijusaurus:

Another highlight of G-Fest was going to Mark Jaramillo’s Kaiju Gaiden panel, where Mark spoke about his efforts to track down and promote practically unheard-of independent, professionally produced, Japanese-made kaiju films, and his intent to chronicle their history in a documentary. I attended with astoundingbeyondbelief and fury-of-neemz, and we got to see clips from such films as…

  • Atragon 2, which looks like it depicts a second invasion attempt by the Mu empire (including sending Manda on a city rampage), forcing the Goten-go and its crew to once again defend humanity. 
  • Matango 2, which (from the brief clips we saw) looks basically like Dawn of the Dead with mushroom men, which is pretty much exactly what I’d want from a Matango sequel.
  • The Resurrection of Daimajin looks like it shows Daimajin awakening in the present day, going on a rampage in a Japanese city, punishing us for our decadent modern ways.

Hopefully, one day, we’ll be able to see much more of these films! Through the weekend, Mark also showed me lengthy footage from Legendary Giant Beast Wolfman vs. Godzilla (which looks amazing, by the way), and some Hong Kong kaiju films I’d never even heard of!

This is part of what I adore about this genre - there’s always something new to discover.

a modern day daimajin?! :O

That’s also the premise of the 2010 TV show Daimajin Kanon.

gothicserpent asked:

Atragon 2? Matango 2? I've looked these up and nothing comes up for them. Also, what other Hong Kong kaiju flicks were shown?

The Kaiju Gaiden Twitter account has a (low-quality) picture from each of them. But yeah, I had no idea they existed either until I first read about the panel. You’d have to ask kaijusaurus about the Hong Kong kaiju films - he was shown those outside of the panel, and I wasn’t present.

riftwitch:

When doing a Toho kaiju redesign series, it is ABSOLUTELY VITAL that your Gigan and Megalon go together. 

I’m not that fond of how Megalon and Gigan Neo looked individually, but Matt knew full well how important this was, and gave them the same surface look to tie them together. 

Gigan may have debuted with King Ghidorah, but it wasn’t until Megalon that he found his center. 

What I’m saying is, Gigan and Megalon are my platonic OTP. 

kaijusaurus:

Another highlight of G-Fest was going to Mark Jaramillo’s Kaiju Gaiden panel, where Mark spoke about his efforts to track down and promote practically unheard-of independent, professionally produced, Japanese-made kaiju films, and his intent to chronicle their history in a documentary. I attended with astoundingbeyondbelief and fury-of-neemz, and we got to see clips from such films as…

  • Atragon 2, which looks like it depicts a second invasion attempt by the Mu empire (including sending Manda on a city rampage), forcing the Goten-go and its crew to once again defend humanity. 
  • Matango 2, which (from the brief clips we saw) looks basically like Dawn of the Dead with mushroom men, which is pretty much exactly what I’d want from a Matango sequel.
  • The Resurrection of Daimajin looks like it shows Daimajin awakening in the present day, going on a rampage in a Japanese city, punishing us for our decadent modern ways.

Hopefully, one day, we’ll be able to see much more of these films! Through the weekend, Mark also showed me lengthy footage from Legendary Giant Beast Wolfman vs. Godzilla (which looks amazing, by the way), and some Hong Kong kaiju films I’d never even heard of!

This is part of what I adore about this genre - there’s always something new to discover.

Don’t forget Ultraman Returns (1983), directed by and starring Hideaki Anno as Ultraman!

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